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Apple Lays Off More Than 600 Workers in California Amid Tech Industry Consolidation

Apple Lays Off More Than 600 Workers in California Amid Tech Industry Consolidation


In a surprising move, tech giant Apple has announced the layoff of more than 600 workers in California.

This significant reduction in workforce marks the company's first major round of post-pandemic job cuts and comes amidst a broader trend of industry consolidation.

On March 28, 2024, Apple notified 614 workers across multiple offices in California that their jobs were being eliminated.



The layoffs are set to take effect on May 27. The affected employees were spread across eight offices in Santa Clara. However, the specific departments or projects impacted remain undisclosed.

For years, Apple stood as an exception in the tech landscape, avoiding large-scale layoffs while other companies downsized during the pandemic.



Apple's move reflects broader industry trends. Other tech giants have also made workforce adjustments recently:

Amazon: The e-commerce behemoth announced fresh layoffs, this time affecting its cloud computing business, AWS.

Electronic Arts: The video game maker is cutting about 5% of its workforce.

Sony: The company is axing approximately 900 jobs in its PlayStation division.

Cisco Systems: The networking giant revealed plans to lay off over 4,000 workers.

Snap: The social media company, owner of Snapchat, is slashing 10% of its global workforce.

Apple's decision underscores the delicate balance between growth and cost management.

As the tech industry evolves, companies face the challenge of maintaining innovation while streamlining operations.

The impact on affected employees and their families remains a pressing concern.

In a recent regulatory filing, Apple reported approximately 161,000 full-time equivalent employees. The company's commitment to its remaining workforce and the broader implications for the industry will be closely watched.